APEX ACQUISITIONS & HOLDINGS, LLC.

Types of Sinkholes

 

                 HOME    WHAT IS A SINKHOLE    SIGNS TO WATCH FOR    SINKHOLE HOUSES

 
Dissolution and weathering processes sculpt carbonate rocks into a distinct geomorphology known as Karst. Carbonate rocks are comprised of soluble limestone and dolomite. The feature characters of Karst terrains are directly related to the dissolution of limestone and ground water flow and induce sinkholes, caves, springs, internally drained basins, disappearing streams, and sub-surface drainage networks. Faults, fractures, bedding planes and differences in mineral composition are an additional factor in development, orientation, extent of the ground water system. Lineaments are linked with locations of sinkholes and highly transmissive zones in the carbonate platform.
 
Florida generally has three prevalent types of sinkholes: dissolution, cover subsidence, and cover collapse sinkholes. The ultimate cause of all sinkholes is dissolution of the limestone foundation. However, the type of sinkhole is also controlled by the thickness and type of overburden materials and the local hydrology. Although it is common to classify sinkholes into three distinct types, sinkholes can be combinations of types and/or may form in several phases.
 

Dissolution Sinkholes: Formation of this type of sinkhole is by rainfall and surface water percolating through joints in the limestone. The dissolved carbonate rock is carried away from the surface and a depression gradually forms.

 
Cover Subsidence Sinkholes: This types of sinkhole tends to develop gradually where the covering sediments are permeable and contain sand. The spalling of granular sediments into secondary openings in the underlying carbonate rock. A column of overlying sediment settles into the vacated spaces known as piping. The infilling and dissolution process continues, eventually forming a noticeable depression in the land surface

Cover Collapse Sinkholes: This types of sinkhole may develop abruptly over a period of hours and cause catastrophic damage. It occurs where the overburden sediments contain a significant amount of clay. Initially, the spalling sediments or percolate into the carbonate rock formation. As the spalling continues, the cohesive covering sediments form a structural arch. The cavity migrates upward by the progressing roof collapse of the overburden. The cavity eventually breaches the ground surface.

If you have a unrepaired sinkhole problem at your house and want to sell call us today!

 

CALL US NOW DON'T DELAY!

 

 

Toll free number: 1-(866)-410-7027 (TOLL FREE)

 

   

 

 

 

HOME

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Links